Kiwi Fruit Jam

This is late March and almost nothing is really in season. But I make some things year round – when I run out I just make another batch as long as I can get the ingredients. This is the case with kiwi jam.

kiwi jam

For this recipe you need to start with 1kg (in this case 9) of fruit. After peeling and coring them I ended up with approximately 900g of usable fruit. I removed the hard, white cores with a paring knife but I didn’t remove the black seeds and the flesh surrounding them. That would be wasteful and the seeds add a delicious little crunch to the jam.

kiwi jam
Next I processed them in a pulp with a food processor until I got a fluffy, light consistency.

kiwi jam

I placed them in a pan and cooked for 45 minutes, while adding the following:

kiwi jam

 

 

 

 

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup lemon juice

3 Tbsp gelling sugar (it’s in every store here in Norway, look in the section where they have all the sugar and flours for baking)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I made sure to stir a lot, just to keep the mixture uniform. Kiwis give a very watery pulp so it takes time for it to reduce a little bit and either way the jam was still as watery as juice when I was pouring it in jars.

kiwi jamkiwi jam

In the meantime I preheated my oven to 100C/212F and put clean open jars in there for 10 minutes.

I boiled some water in a kettle, placed the lids in a bowl and submerged them in hot water from the kettle.
I put on my kitchen mittens, took the hot jars out of the oven, through a funnel I poured hot jam into them and immediately closed them with the hot lids.

kiwi jam

Within an hour all the lids were concave and the jars were sealed.

Within the next two hours all the jam set, so that it stopped sloshing around when I was moving the jars.
This is the canning method that I use, very inexpensive and not requiring any special equipment. I keep my jams for 3 to 4 months and never had an issue. Once opened, I keep them in the fridge and use within 2 weeks.

I am not sure how long these jams could keep like that because they are always gone quickly.

If you have a pressure canner and want to use it, do it because at least you will have guaranteed results and you will be able to keep your jams for a very long time.

 

This jam is delicious on bread or in porridge when you want to add a little tropical flavour.

kiwi jam
© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Persimon Jam – no special canning equipment needed!

During the winter not many fruit are in season but it is the season for persimon all the way from November through February so it’s a good idea to have some of that delicious fruit. One thing you can do with it is jam. Who doesn’t like some nice and exotic jam, after all?

 

I can see all over the internet that there are two spellings and both seem to be used interchangeably: persimon and persimmon. There are also two varieties of the fruit: fuyu and hachiya , I am using the hachiya, which is a little bit more elongated than the fuyu and also quite sour if not fully ripe. I haven’t tried making jam with the fuyu but I imagine it would work pretty much the same way.

 

persimon jam

For this recipe you need to start with 1kg (in this case 7 of them) of fruit. After peeling and coring them I ended up with 900g of usable fruit.

I peeled them with a vegetable peeler to minimize waste and cored them very much the same way I core apples. Cut them in 4 and then cut out the cores.

persimon jam

Next I processed them into a pulp. I first tried a stick blender but that proved difficult, so I switched to a food processor and worked until I got a fluffy, light consistency.

persimon jam

I placed them in a pan and cooked for 30 minutes, while adding the following:

1 1/2 cup sugar

4 Tbsp lemon juice

2 Tbsp gelling sugar (it’s in every store here in Norway, look in the section where they have all the sugar and flours for baking)

I made sure to stir a lot, because I could see the blended fruit could easily burn to the bottom of the pot. If this happens to your jam, don’t scrape but mix the rest of the jam and hopefully you’ll be able to use just the top part without the burnt mass in the bottom. You can also pour your fruit to another pan if that helps.

In the meantime I preheated my oven to 100C/212F and put clean open jars in there for 10 minutes.

I boiled some water in a kettle, placed the lids in a bowl and submerged them in hot water from the kettle.

 

And at last comes the final part. I put on my kitchen mittens, took the hot jars out of the oven, spooned hot jam into them and immediately closed them with the hot lids.

Within an hour all the lids were concave and the jars were sealed.

 

persimon jam

 

This is the canning method that I use, very inexpensive and not requiring any special equipment. I keep my jams for 3 to 4 months and never had an issue. Once opened, I keep them in the fridge and use within 2 weeks.

I am not sure how long these jams could keep like that because they are always gone quickly.

If you have a pressure canner and want to use it, do it because at least you will have guaranteed results and you will be able to keep your jams for a very long time.

 

 

© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tattoo My Broccoli Applesauce Recipe

Applesauce features in so many of my recipes that I know that by now I owe you an explanation. Using applesauce as an important ingredient in baking came to me after I got two jars of homemade applesauce from my partner’s Mum. I had them in the fridge and wasn’t sure what to do with them until I decided to google it and see what I can do so that it wouldn’t go to waste. And there I discovered the world of applesauce everything and I learnt how big applesauce is in the US.

Where I live now, in Norway, you can’t even really get it in the shop. I started experimenting and it never went wrong, so I loved it. Later I started making my own from bought apples and when the season came, also from apples I could pick. So here I am, adding it to pretty much everything now and making my cakes that small bit healthier. I want to be able to enjoy cake for many years of my life, so I’m trying to go easy on fat and sugar. Using the applesauce to replace the oil or butter in my cakes helps me do just that.

applesauce

There are a million and one recipes out there for applesauce but this is how I make it. And knowing how lazy I can be you won’t be surprised that I don’t peel the apples. Added nutrition from the skins makes me happy and my hands thank me for less work. I recommend that lazy approach to everybody. 🙂 This recipe also does not require any fancy canning equipment. Well washed jars after mayo, pickles or jams will do.

 

What you need:

apples

sugar (I use around 1 tsp of sugar for each apple but you can also go completely without sugar)

a saucepan

a knife

food processor or blender

jars

applesauce

Wash apples and quarter them, cut out the cores.

If using a food processor, turn the apples into pulp. If using a stick blender, just chop them with a knife for now.

Place the apples and sugar in a pot. If you have already processed them, it’s advisable to pour a little water in the bottom of the pot, so that they don’t stick.

Let them cook for an hour, until you can see the mixture is becoming thicker. Blend the chopped apples with the stick blender if you have chosen that method.

Keep the apples on the stove while you prepare the jars.

Preheat the oven to 100C/210F and put the open jars in there for 10 minutes. In the meantime, submerge lids in hot water from the kettle.

Put on your kitchen mittens and spoon hot apples straight from the pot into hot jars straight from the oven. Close with the lids immediately and leave on the counter.

After an hour or so you will start hearing popping sounds from the jars sealing.

Wait until the next day and check that all the lids are concave. If any of them didn’t seal, keep them in the fridge and use within a week. The rest can be kept on the shelf in the pantry. They normally all seal, as long as you jar the apples while still hot.

applesauce

Enjoy in cakes as well as on bread.

 

Applesauce is also a delicious gift to somebody you like.

 
© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Enjoy Your Tea with a Lemon Twist – Lemon Syrup for Tea

Are you in love with green, white or black tea just like me? I get into buying these white tea varieties and drink them with a lot of pleasure throughout the beautiful, snowy Norwegian winter. But I have to admit that every once in a while I feel like having something refreshing and new. And I try for it not to be soda or some other fizzy badness.

lemon syrup

So this is my recipe for a homemade lemon syrup which turns your tea into a totally new experience. This recipe yields about 250ml or just over 1 cup of syrup. Google tells me that 1 cup is 48 teaspoons and you really don’t need any more than a teaspoon in each tea, so this will last you quite a while. I use a bottle I got with another, store-bought berry syrup because it’s the perfect size. A jar will also do well.

lemon syrupIngredients:
3 lemons
6 Tablespoons of sugar

Tools:
a saucepan,
a jar or a bottle to hold the syrup when it’s ready,
a sieve

 

 

 

 

First, juice your lemons. This is the part of the recipe where you have to work the hardest :D. I just do it manually, squeeze all these sour juices out of them.
You should get around 300ml of lemon juice from 3 standard, medium lemons. It’s a good idea to roll them on the tabletop a bit before cutting and juicing as this helps them release more juice.

 

 

 

 

Next pour the juice into a pot on medium heat and add sugar. Stir until all the sugar has dissolved. Wait for the mixture to boil and let boil for 2 to 3 minutes. This will reduce it a bit, so it will be less watery.

 

lemon syrup

Pour it into your bottle or jar through a sieve, so that any pips stay behind.

Enjoy in tea! Amazing!

© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.