grandma's pasta

This is one of those super simple recipes. It comes from my grandma who has enjoyed it any time she was able to get the ingredients. She really likes to add a lot of cream to her recipes. I asked her about it and she said that when she was a young girl in the Second World War they had little food. Her family was from the countryside and they managed to keep a cow despite all of the difficulties. She said that sometimes these milk products coming from the cow were lifesavers and the only thing they had for the whole day. You’d think that would put a person off cream for life but instead cream and milk are my grandma’s favourite things.

 

About the ingredients for this recipe. The pasta grandma uses is a short, thin pasta, thin like angel hair or capellini but short. I imagine other small pasta types could be used here with success.

For sausage my grandma’s favourite choice here is hotdogs. You can also use kielbasa, wieners or anything else that you like.

You’ll also notice marjoram. If this herb is alien to you, just use oregano instead. Also, if you like your food spicy, this can be delicious with cayenne pepper.

This amount serves 4.

grandma's pasta

Ingredients:

a teaspoon of oil for frying

2 cups dry thin pasta or whatever is your normal amount for 4 people (a lot depends here on the exact pasta type)

4 sausages

1 onion

1 garlic clove

1/2 cup single cream

2 Tbsp tomato paste

1 tsp marjoram

a handful of grated cheese

salt and pepper to taste

grandma's pasta

In a large frying pan, add oil and sliced sausages. Let them brown while you are chopping onion and garlic. Once the sausages are browned to your liking, add onion and garlic.

In the meantime, boil pasta according to instructions on the packet.

Add hot, drained pasta to the sausages and follow with cream, tomato paste, herbs, cheese, salt and pepper. Mix well.

Done! I love this with a big, green salad.

 

© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

lecso

Lecso is originally a Hungarian dish but it is also known and eaten in other countries of the area. The version I’m giving you is a Polish take on it. This is just one way of making it but it’s my favourite way. Other versionslecso call for lard as the fat, which I don’t like or tell you not to add courgettes. This is my version, influenced by the many times I ate it in Poland and I’m sure you’ll enjoy it too.

This is a dish with so many delicious vegetables that you can just about forgive yourself having the sausage that goes in it too. It’s a hearty, comforting stew and you can make it quite spicy if you like that. Usually served with a slice of bread, although some people like it with potatoes, which always seems a bit weird to me but by all means go ahead if that appeals to you. I’ve eaten it without the bread and it was still filling and amazing. This is also a one pot operation so no hardcore washing up afterwards.

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If you come across one problem it will be obtaining the right sausage. Any dry one will do, in the worst case even salami, just don’t use hotdogs. Chorizo works great as does Polish dry sausage. In better-stocked supermarkets or food markets you might come across Debrecener sausage and that is highly recommended for lecso. Good Luck!

lecso detailIngredients:

a small splash of oil
1 medium onion
2 garlic cloves
1½ medium size (banana size?) dry sausage
3 red peppers
1 yellow pepper
1 spicy chilli pepper (optional)
2 courgettes
4 tomatoes
spices: red paprika, chilli flakes, salt and black pepper

Take a good, rather big pot and once the onion and garlic are finely chopped, put them on heated oil and start frying while you slice the sausage. You want the kind of slices that you’ll be happy to eat. Not very thick but also not paper thin. Add those slices to the pot as well and let it slightly brown while you’re chopping courgettes and peppers into approximately 1cm cubes/pieces.

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Once chopped, add them to the pot and stir. At this point the dish will stop frying and slowly start boiling. The vegetables will let their delicious juices run. Put tomatoes in a bowl and pour freshly boiled water from the kettle over them to remove the skins.
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Once the skins are off, chop the tomatoes roughly and add to lecso. Add 1 tablespoon of paprika, chilli flakes to your taste and salt. Turn the heat down, put the lid on and let the magic happen for another half an hour.

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If you’re just an average person like me, the chopping should take so much time that once you add tomatoes, it shouldn’t take longer than 30 minutes before all of the ingredients are soft and cooked through with lots of juice. Add black pepper and serve in bowls.
lecso

This amount serves 4.

© Julia Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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