kiwi jam

This is late March and almost nothing is really in season. But I make some things year round – when I run out I just make another batch as long as I can get the ingredients. This is the case with kiwi jam.

kiwi jam

For this recipe you need to start with 1kg (in this case 9) of fruit. After peeling and coring them I ended up with approximately 900g of usable fruit. I removed the hard, white cores with a paring knife but I didn’t remove the black seeds and the flesh surrounding them. That would be wasteful and the seeds add a delicious little crunch to the jam.

kiwi jam
Next I processed them in a pulp with a food processor until I got a fluffy, light consistency.

kiwi jam

I placed them in a pan and cooked for 45 minutes, while adding the following:

kiwi jam

 

 

 

 

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup lemon juice

3 Tbsp gelling sugar (it’s in every store here in Norway, look in the section where they have all the sugar and flours for baking)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I made sure to stir a lot, just to keep the mixture uniform. Kiwis give a very watery pulp so it takes time for it to reduce a little bit and either way the jam was still as watery as juice when I was pouring it in jars.

kiwi jamkiwi jam

In the meantime I preheated my oven to 100C/212F and put clean open jars in there for 10 minutes.

I boiled some water in a kettle, placed the lids in a bowl and submerged them in hot water from the kettle.
I put on my kitchen mittens, took the hot jars out of the oven, through a funnel I poured hot jam into them and immediately closed them with the hot lids.

kiwi jam

Within an hour all the lids were concave and the jars were sealed.

Within the next two hours all the jam set, so that it stopped sloshing around when I was moving the jars.
This is the canning method that I use, very inexpensive and not requiring any special equipment. I keep my jams for 3 to 4 months and never had an issue. Once opened, I keep them in the fridge and use within 2 weeks.

I am not sure how long these jams could keep like that because they are always gone quickly.

If you have a pressure canner and want to use it, do it because at least you will have guaranteed results and you will be able to keep your jams for a very long time.

 

This jam is delicious on bread or in porridge when you want to add a little tropical flavour.

kiwi jam
© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

jam muffins

These muffins sound exotic, I know. Lingonberry is very popular here in Norway and comes as a tyttebær jam in a jar. It’s commonly used to accompany meat but also other things. But then… you end up with a jar of it in the fridge. It can be eaten on toast but I didn’t like it so I decided to mix it in with some dough for muffins. You can by all means use any other jam that you have leftover. I imagine strawberry would be amazing. I am also going to try redcurrant and blueberry.

 

jam muffinsIngredients:

1 3/4 cup all purpose flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 cup sugar

2 eggs

1/4 cup rapeseed oil

1/4 cup applesauce (you can use oil here if you have no applesauce)

3/4 cup milk

1/2 cup jam

 

 

 

 

 

Preheat the oven to 200C/400F.

jam muffins

In a bowl mix flour, baking powder and sugar. Add eggs, oil, applesauce, milk and jam. Stir but only until there are no more pockets of dry flour. Don’t continue mixing so that the muffins are not hard when baked.

Line a 12 hole muffin tray with paper cases. I use two in each because it makes the outer ones nicer to hold while eating.

jam muffins

 

Bake for 30 minutes or until the muffins pass a cocktail stick test.

 

jam muffins

 

© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

blackcurrant cake

Last summer I made so many jars of preserves I now am looking at a full fridge of blackcurrant and other currant jam and syrup.

blackcurrant cake

Blackcurrant jam is delicious but who can eat it every morning? It’s just too sweet. So I decided I would use it for cakes. This is one of those glorious recipes where you get to use the whole jar of jam. I imagine other jams would do well here too, consider cherry or something else that has a bit of sourness to it. I haven’t tried it but I imagine strawberry or blueberry would just be too sweet in this recipe.

blackcurrant cake

 

This is also a recipe where I use applesauce instead of part of the fat. You can just use oil instead but I love being able to reduce fat in this cake and bring some vitamins and apple goodness instead.

blackcurrant cakeblackcurrant cake

blackcurrant cakeIngredients:

1/4 cup oil

1/3 cup applesauce (you can use oil instead but it’s healthier with applesauce)

1 cup sugar

1 egg

1 1/4 cup plain flour

1 3/4 cup oats

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup jam

 

 

 

 

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.

In a kitchen robot, start beating oil and sugar until it becomes slightly fluffy and lighter in texture. Add applesauce, egg, vanilla extract and beat until  well combined. Switch off the whisk and add flour, baking powder, salt and mix with a spatula until uniform.  Add most of the oats and mix again.

blackcurrant cake

Line a baking tin with baking paper, I use a 21cm/8inch square tin. Press the mixture into the bottom.

blackcurrant cake

Cover the mixture with blackcurrant jam.

blackcurrant cake

Sprinkle the remaining oats on top. Another version I sometimes make is to sprinkle a little leftover dough on top also.

 

Bake for 30 minutes.

blackcurrant cake

 

© Julia Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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