anise butter

This butter is a delicious and a little fancy way to use your apples. I always make a lot of standard applesauce with the apple harvest around this time of the year but it’s good to make a small batch of something special and different. This butter has a complex flavour and smell and it gives your taste buds something to experience when eaten spread on bread. I usually pair it with some fresh fruit on the side but I have also tried it with a slice of cheese on top and as weird as this sounds, it was still very enjoyable.

anise butter

 

Ingredients:

7 standard, supermarket size apples

2 whole stars anise

1/4 tsp dried ginger

1/4 tsp cardamom

1/2 cup sugar

7 dried apricots

2 Tbsp lemon juice

anise butter

First core and chop apples into small cubes. I don’t peel them.

Place apples in the slow cooker, chop the apricots finely, which is annoying because they are small and stick to the knife but you’ll manage (I did).

Add apricots and all of the spices, lemon juice as well as sugar. Stir to distribute the spices evenly.

Cook on high for 5 hours.

anise butter

Once cooked, take the two stars anise out and use an immersion (stick) blender to process the mixture into a pulp.

Next, put it back on to cook before you start canning, just to make sure that you are canning very hot butter, straight from the cooker.

With canning, I use hot jars, which I kept in an oven preheated to 100C/212F for at least 10 minutes (sometimes longer if I forget that they are there). I also give the lids a bath in hot water from the kettle.

I pick them out one by one and fill with the hot butter, leaving  a little bit of space on top. I close them immediately and set on the counter to let them cool to room temperature over the next couple of hours.

anise butter

Soon you should hear the lids popping as they are sealing. If any of them doesn’t seal and the lid is not concave, treat it as open, keep in the fridge and use within a couple of days.

I have been canning fruit this way for a while and I haven’t had any issues but if you look online there is a myriad of ways to do it and some ways are safer than this one, as they carry less risk of some bacteria surviving in the jar. Pick your own method and be safe!

anise butter

 

© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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When I was a little girl my Grandma used to make a similar dish in a remoska mini oven that we had. She continued always making this particular dish in the remoska even though we already had a standard oven, so when the remoska was out of the cabinets, I knew the delicious cinnamon smell would soon fill the whole house. Ah, the childhood memories!

You can check out what a remoska is here. I can see the nostalgia is not only mine and the remoska seems to be making a brilliant comeback as an electricity saving oven. Well done! Maybe I’ll get one too?

We ate this as a normal dinner. Maybe you’ll like it better as a lunch or even dessert! This was back under communism when eating meat everyday was just not how things were, so rice with apples seemed like a very good dinner idea. We were not obese back then, so sometimes I look back into these times to see if I can find any more healthy recipes. Now, bear in mind that this is not diet food either as it has sugar.

I now adapted this recipe to my lifestyle and more modern likes (like brown rice instead of white) and this is what I came up with. I hope you enjoy!

applesauce rice

 

 

applesauce rice

 

 

Ingredients:
1 cup uncooked brown rice
1 cup applesauce (mine has very little sugar)
2 cups water
1/4 cup sugar
2 Tbsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
2 apples
a handful of dried cranberries
a pinch of dried ginger
a pinch of dried cardamom

an oven-safe dish with a lid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preheat the oven to 200C/400F.

Wash your rice in a sieve and dump in the baking dish, add water, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, salt and stir to evenly distribute all the ingredients.

Add applesauce and stir again.

applesauce rice

Cut apples into slices, I cut them widthwise and just remove the middle to save time. Place apples on top of your mixture and press lightly to submerge them in the sweet, spiced water.

Sprinkle with cranberries.

Put the lid on and bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until the rice is done. Brown rice likes to take its time :)

applesauce rice

This amount serves 4 for a light and delicious meal.

Enjoy!

 

© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

applesauce

Applesauce features in so many of my recipes that I know that by now I owe you an explanation. Using applesauce as an important ingredient in baking came to me after I got two jars of homemade applesauce from my partner’s Mum. I had them in the fridge and wasn’t sure what to do with them until I decided to google it and see what I can do so that it wouldn’t go to waste. And there I discovered the world of applesauce everything and I learnt how big applesauce is in the US.

Where I live now, in Norway, you can’t even really get it in the shop. I started experimenting and it never went wrong, so I loved it. Later I started making my own from bought apples and when the season came, also from apples I could pick. So here I am, adding it to pretty much everything now and making my cakes that small bit healthier. I want to be able to enjoy cake for many years of my life, so I’m trying to go easy on fat and sugar. Using the applesauce to replace the oil or butter in my cakes helps me do just that.

applesauce

There are a million and one recipes out there for applesauce but this is how I make it. And knowing how lazy I can be you won’t be surprised that I don’t peel the apples. Added nutrition from the skins makes me happy and my hands thank me for less work. I recommend that lazy approach to everybody. :) This recipe also does not require any fancy canning equipment. Well washed jars after mayo, pickles or jams will do.

 

What you need:

apples

sugar (I use around 1 tsp of sugar for each apple but you can also go completely without sugar)

a saucepan

a knife

food processor or blender

jars

applesauce

Wash apples and quarter them, cut out the cores.

If using a food processor, turn the apples into pulp. If using a stick blender, just chop them with a knife for now.

Place the apples and sugar in a pot. If you have already processed them, it’s advisable to pour a little water in the bottom of the pot, so that they don’t stick.

Let them cook for an hour, until you can see the mixture is becoming thicker. Blend the chopped apples with the stick blender if you have chosen that method.

Keep the apples on the stove while you prepare the jars.

Preheat the oven to 100C/210F and put the open jars in there for 10 minutes. In the meantime, submerge lids in hot water from the kettle.

Put on your kitchen mittens and spoon hot apples straight from the pot into hot jars straight from the oven. Close with the lids immediately and leave on the counter.

After an hour or so you will start hearing popping sounds from the jars sealing.

Wait until the next day and check that all the lids are concave. If any of them didn’t seal, keep them in the fridge and use within a week. The rest can be kept on the shelf in the pantry. They normally all seal, as long as you jar the apples while still hot.

applesauce

Enjoy in cakes as well as on bread.

 

Applesauce is also a delicious gift to somebody you like.

 
© Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli, 2014-2024. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, recipes and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Julia M Wlodarczyk and Tattoo My Broccoli with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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