anise butter

This butter is a delicious and a little fancy way to use your apples. I always make a lot of standard applesauce with the apple harvest around this time of the year but it’s good to make a small batch of something special and different. This butter has a complex flavour and smell and it gives your taste buds something to experience when eaten spread on bread. I usually pair it with some fresh fruit on the side but I have also tried it with a slice of cheese on top and as weird as this sounds, it was still very enjoyable.

anise butter

 

Ingredients:

7 standard, supermarket size apples

2 whole stars anise

1/4 tsp dried ginger

1/4 tsp cardamom

1/2 cup sugar

7 dried apricots

2 Tbsp lemon juice

anise butter

First core and chop apples into small cubes. I don’t peel them.

Place apples in the slow cooker, chop the apricots finely, which is annoying because they are small and stick to the knife but you’ll manage (I did).

Add apricots and all of the spices, lemon juice as well as sugar. Stir to distribute the spices evenly.

Cook on high for 5 hours.

anise butter

Once cooked, take the two stars anise out and use an immersion (stick) blender to process the mixture into a pulp.

Next, put it back on to cook before you start canning, just to make sure that you are canning very hot butter, straight from the cooker.

With canning, I use hot jars, which I kept in an oven preheated to 100C/212F for at least 10 minutes (sometimes longer if I forget that they are there). I also give the lids a bath in hot water from the kettle.

I pick them out one by one and fill with the hot butter, leaving  a little bit of space on top. I close them immediately and set on the counter to let them cool to room temperature over the next couple of hours.

anise butter

Soon you should hear the lids popping as they are sealing. If any of them doesn’t seal and the lid is not concave, treat it as open, keep in the fridge and use within a couple of days.

I have been canning fruit this way for a while and I haven’t had any issues but if you look online there is a myriad of ways to do it and some ways are safer than this one, as they carry less risk of some bacteria surviving in the jar. Pick your own method and be safe!

anise butter

 

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